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MARILLE presentation at the ECML conference 2011 (pdf)

Short presentation of the project setup at the ECML conference in Graz held in September 2011.

Presentation of MARILLE and its links to other ECML projects (especially CARAP)

Presentation made at the CARAP central workshop held in Graz in November 2012.

Articles about MARILLE in English:

  •  Boeckmann, Klaus-Börge, Eija Aalto, Andrea Abel, Tatjana Atanasoska & Terry Lamb (2011): MARILLE – Promoting plurilingualism in the majority language classroom. Babylonia. A Journal of Language Teaching and Learning, 19: 1 (A place for all languages in school), 44–48. (http://babylonia.ch/de/archiv/2011/nummer-1-11/marille/)

Abstract

Throughout Europe, schools experience a change of language teaching as a result of increasing migration, cultural diversity and multilingualism. The MARILLE project is concerned with the language of instruction in schools, which is usually also the official national language, for example German in Austria and Germany, or Norwegian in Norway. In this project, the teaching of the language of instruction is called majority language teaching. Today, school children bring many different languages to school, but still the teachers of the majority language usually have little training in teaching their languages as second languages or in developing the plurilingual repertoire of their students. MARILLE aims at integrating elements of L2 teaching and plurilingual education concepts such as language across the curriculum and language awareness into the teaching of the majority language.

Abstract

This paper presents a European Centre for Modern Languages project about plurilingual majority language teaching. ‘Majority language’ is the term used in the project to refer to the national language(s)/language(s) of instruction in schools. ‘Plurilingualism’ is used with reference to Council of Europe terminology to denote individual learner's repertoires in multiple languages. The project aimed to find out how teachers of the majority language manage to cope with the challenge of plurilingualism, which they usually were not prepared for in their initial training. Firstly, the paper discusses the results of a small-scale survey among experts from 23 European countries that showed the large gap between perceived needs and concrete measures and resources in this field. Then, the project activities are described: collecting and documenting different varieties of resources, developing practice examples and providing classroom videos to illustrate the principles of plurilingual majority language teaching. Lastly, the paper explains how these principles identified by the project were structured and phrased to become easily manageable by teaching practitioners, how the practice examples illustrate the implementation of these principles in the classroom and how the project offers ideas on how to manage the change towards a plurilingual majority language classroom.

 

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